Uncategorized

Numbers, dates, time and quantities

Numbers

For numbers over 20:

  • 21 -> einundzwanzig (one-and-twenty)
  • 22 -> zweiundzwanzig (two-and-twenty)

For numbers over 100:

  • 100 -> hundert/einhundert
  • 200 -> zweihundert etc
  • 1000 -> tausend/eintausend
  • 2000 -> zweitausend etc
  • 110 -> hundert zehn (hundred, ten – not a hundred and ten)
  • 121 -> hundert einundzwanzig (hundred, one-and-twenty)
  • 221 -> zweihundert einundzwanzig (two-hundred, one-and-twenty)
  • 1221 -> tausend, zweihundert einundzwanzig (thousand, two-hundred, one-and-twenty)

Numbers in dates

The ordinal numbers (1st, 2nd, 3rd etc):

In German, 1st, 3rd and 7th are irregular:

  • 1st -> ersten
  • 3rd -> dritten
  • 7th -> siebten (sieben drops the last ‘-en’)

From the 4th to 19th, take the number and add ‘-ten’ to the end, eg:

  • 4th -> vierten
  • 8th -> achten (don’t need an extra ‘t’)
  • 12th -> zwölften
  • 19th -> neunzehnten

From the 20th upwards, take the number and add ‘-sten’ to the end, eg:

  • 20th -> zwanzigsten
  • 41st -> einundvierzigsten
  • 76th -> sechsundsiebzigsten
  • 224th -> zweihundert vierundzwanzigsten
  • 3496th -> dreitausend vierhundert sechsundneunzigsten

Dates

Months

German English
Januar January
Februar February
März March
April April
Mai May
Juni June
Juli July
August August
September September
Oktober October
November November
Dezember December

Combining numbers and dates

  • Ich habe am sechsten Juli Geburtstag -> My birthday is on the 6th of July.
  • Meine Mutter hat am achtzehnten November Geburtstag -> My mum’s birthday is on the 18th of November.
  • Weihnachten ist am fünfundzwanzigsten Dezember -> Christmas is on the 25th of December.

Dates

Montag, den 22. Februar

The dot after the number is the abbreviation for ‘-ten‘ or ‘-sten‘.

Time

The digital clock

The 24-hour digital clock commonly used in Germany, especially for timetables.

  • Uhr = o’clock.
  • drei Uhr = 3:00
  • drei Uhr dreißig = 3:30
  • zwanzig Uhr fünf = 20:05

The analogue clock

  • Uhr = o’clock
  • Viertel = quarter
  • nach = past
  • vor = to
  • halb = half ‘to’

Examples

  • drei Uhr = three o’clock
  • viertel nach drei = quarter past three
  • zwanzig vor drei = twenty to three
  • halb drei = half ‘to’ three (half past two)

Asking for and giving times

  • Wie spät ist es? -> What time ‘how late’ is it?
  • Wieviel Uhr ist es? -> What time is it?
  • Es ist fünf nach sieben -> It is 7:05.
  • Wann beginnt das Stück? -> When does the play start?
  • Um wieviel Uhr beginnt das Stück? -> What time does the play start?
  • Das Stück beginnt um fünf nach sieben -> The play starts at 7:05.

As well as ‘um’, the following are useful when talking about times:

  • vor (before) – Kannst du vor 10 Uhr kommen? -> Can you come before 10:00?
  • gegen (about) – Ich werde gegen 9 Uhr da sein -> I’ll be there about 9:00.
  • erst um (not until) – Ich kann erst um 9:30 da sein -> I can’t get there until 9:30.
  • nach (after) – Er wird nach Mitternacht kommen -> He’ll come after midnight.

Other time vocabulary

  • Mitternacht – Midnight
  • Mittag – Midday
  • Morgen – Morning
  • Nachmittag – Afternoon
  • Abend – Evening
  • Nacht – Night
  • früh – Early
  • spät – Late

Quantities

Useful vocabulary: quantities

German English
ein Stück A piece
eine Dose A can/tin
ein Paket A packet
eine Tüte A bag
eine Flasche A bottle
ein Kilo A kilogram
hundert Gramm 100g
eine Tasse A cup
ein Glas A jar/glass
einmal One (portion)
zweimal Two (portions) etc

To use them, you don’t need ‘of’ as in ‘a piece of cake’ – just ‘ein Stück Kuchen’.

  • Ich möchte ein Stück Kuchen -> I’d like a piece of cake.
  • Ich hätte gern eine Flasche Rotwein -> I’d like to have a bottle of red wine.
  • Haben Sie zwei Glas Sauerkraut? -> Have you got two jars of Sauerkraut?
  • Ich möchte drei Kilo Kirschen bitte -> I’d like 3kg of cherries please.
  • Zweimal Pommes, bitte -> two portions of chips, please.

Common mistakes made by English speakers

  • Missing off the -ten/-sten off cardinal numbers.
  • Saying ‘halb’ for half past an hour, not half to the next one.

Comments are closed.

Powered by: Wordpress